YOUTH INITIATIVES

My Brother’s Keeper Alliance

Unlocking Opportunities for Young Men of Color

About

My Brother’s Keeper addresses persistent opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color to ensure all youth can reach their full potential. This nationwide effort was launched in 2014 by President Obama and the work continues as the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Alliance, an initiative of the Obama Foundation. The MBK Alliance focuses on building safe and supportive communities for boys and young men of color where they feel valued and have clear pathways to opportunity.

Nearly 250 cities, towns, counties and tribal nations in all 50 U.S. states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia accepted the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Community Challenge. MBK communities are answering President Obama’s powerful call to action by working across sectors and organizations to convene leaders, identify effective strategies, and affect systems change in their local communities.

THE CHALLENGE

Our country’s persistent social inequities are widespread, rooted in structural and institutional racism, and prevent our boys and young men of color from reaching their full potential.

Poverty: Black, American Indian, and Hispanic children are between six and nine times more likely than white children to live in areas of concentrated poverty.

Discipline: African-American students represent 16 percent of the public school student population, but make up 42 percent of those suspended more than once, and 34 percent of students expelled.

Graduation: High school graduation rates for black and Hispanic students are 16 and 12 percentage points lower than white students, respectively. Many districts see 50% graduation rates or worse for boys of color.

Employment: A black baby boy born 25 years ago has a 1 in 2 chance of being employed today.

Crime: While only 6% of the overall population, Black males account for nearly half of all murder victims.

THE OPPORTUNITY

Improving life prospects and outcomes for young people, including young men of color, is the right thing to do for our economy.

Closing the Education Gap: If we closed the gap in educational attainment between working-age (25-64) men of color and non-Hispanic white men of the same age, the share of working-aged men of color who have a bachelor’s degree or above would double and the total U.S. GDP would increase by 1.8 percent ($350 billion).

Closing the Labor Force Gap: If we closed the gap in labor force participation between 16-to-54 year-old men of color and non-Hispanic white men of the same age, total U.S. GDP would increase by 2 percent.

About

My Brother’s Keeper addresses persistent opportunity gaps facing boys and young men of color to ensure all youth can reach their full potential. This nationwide effort was launched in 2014 by President Obama and the work continues as the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Alliance, an initiative of the Obama Foundation. The MBK Alliance focuses on building safe and supportive communities for boys and young men of color where they feel valued and have clear pathways to opportunity.

Nearly 250 cities, towns, counties and tribal nations in all 50 U.S. states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia accepted the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) Community Challenge. MBK communities are answering President Obama’s powerful call to action by working across sectors and organizations to convene leaders, identify effective strategies, and affect systems change in their local communities.

THE CHALLENGE

Our country’s persistent social inequities are widespread, rooted in structural and institutional racism, and prevent our boys and young men of color from reaching their full potential.

Poverty: Black, American Indian, and Hispanic children are between six and nine times more likely than white children to live in areas of concentrated poverty.

Discipline: African-American students represent 16 percent of the public school student population, but make up 42 percent of those suspended more than once, and 34 percent of students expelled.

Graduation: High school graduation rates for black and Hispanic students are 16 and 12 percentage points lower than white students, respectively. Many districts see 50% graduation rates or worse for boys of color.

Employment: A black baby boy born 25 years ago has a 1 in 2 chance of being employed today.

Crime: While only 6% of the overall population, Black males account for nearly half of all murder victims.

THE OPPORTUNITY

Improving life prospects and outcomes for young people, including young men of color, is the right thing to do for our economy.

Closing the Education Gap: If we closed the gap in educational attainment between working-age (25-64) men of color and non-Hispanic white men of the same age, the share of working-aged men of color who have a bachelor’s degree or above would double and the total U.S. GDP would increase by 1.8 percent ($350 billion).

Closing the Labor Force Gap: If we closed the gap in labor force participation between 16-to-54 year-old men of color and non-Hispanic white men of the same age, total U.S. GDP would increase by 2 percent.

“I have always believed that the single most important task we have as a nation is to make sure our young people can go as far as their dreams and hard work will take them. It is the single most important thing we can do for our country’s future. And we’ve got to do it together.”

President Barack Obama

Join The Program

Set your sights on better opportunities and join My Brother’s Keeper Alliance, Tulsa!

My Brother’s Keeper is hosting a series of focus groups and community meetings through early 2022 as a first step in designing and planning the program for the next five years.

If you have further questions, feel free to contact us at info@impacttulsa.com.