A student successfully completing a course beyond Algebra II more than doubles his or her likelihood of completing a degree. 
Read more from our 2016 Community Impact Report.
Read more from our 2016 Community Impact Report.

WHAT THE DATA SAYS

Oklahoma is adopting new math standards and aligning state assessments in the 2017-2018 school year. Until then, this report includes the state’s seventh-grade math scores for the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test (OCCT) taken by all students except those in higher math courses. When a new state math assessment is adopted for all eighth-grade students, a new baseline will be set and studied over time in comparison to performance on the more rigorous National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

 

Based on the current OCCT assessment, the share of Tulsa area seventh grade-students deemed proficient or advanced in math was virtually unchanged between the two years—62% in 2015 and 61% in 2016. That is lower than the 66% proficiency rate measured statewide xii. Gaps are wider for students who are Hispanic, African American and low-income. Fewer than half of these students met the proficiency standard—49%, 36%, and 48% respectively.

WHY IT MATTERS

Two key factors for selecting a new assessment in middle school math are rigor and college and career readiness. The level of mathematics studied later in high school is strongly correlated with college completion. A student successfully completing a course beyond Algebra II more than doubles his or her likelihood of completing a degree.

HOW TO DRIVE CHANGE

The hands-on nature of STEM opens possibilities for strong community partnerships. Though ImpactTulsa has not yet formed a working group for middle school math, area school districts are working with businesses, post-secondary institutions, and nonprofits to increase STEM opportunities. Programs include direct instruction, mentorships, teacher professional development, internships, and much more.

MAKING AN IMPACT

Though ImpactTulsa has not yet formed a working group for middle school math, area school districts are working with businesses, postsecondary institutions and nonprofits to increase STEM opportunities. Programs include direct instruction, mentorships, teacher professional development, internships, and much more.

Proper assessment and equitable math pathways to STEM careers are important levers in graduating students who are college and career ready. The Tulsa Regional Chamber published a report showing in the year 2013, Tulsa had:

  • 56,234 jobs in the Healthcare; forecasted to grow 14.5% by 2018
  • 37,420 jobs in Advanced Manufacturing; forecasted to grow 4.5% by 2018
  • 12,799 jobs in Aviation and Aerospace; forecasted to grow 8.1% by 2018

 

Increasing the number of students proficient in math is imperative to meeting these industry demands.